Soy Sauce

When I get to the grocery store as usual, there was unusually many customers. They stood in a long queue.

Then someone, likely a shop assistant, called something through the microphone, which was too noisy to understand precisely, but at least I could figure out that it was declaration of a discount service. Then the queue started to move like the Midgard Serpent. But I could not find out where its head was going for, screened by shopping shelves.

Soon the people came back, one by one, with what they got. That was 1-liter PET bottles of soy sauce. Each carried one ore more dark-brown bottles.

The POSs were much crowded with those customers. but, interestingly, the waiting time for each was very short, because most of them had only the soy sauce bottles to be checked out.

I was much impressed at that scene, showing that soy sauce should keep still an important position in japanese daily foods, despite that it is often said their style has been shifted to that of western world.

I came home and told my husband about the peculiar experience above. Then he said,
“It might have been a failure as a sales strategy. The true interest of selling a specific item with a lower price should be that the customers will buy some other things in addition to the discounted one. If, as you told me, nothing more than the discounted items were sold, it means only the seller had left their items with less interest.”

Ah, yes. Maybe the seller had no choice, because march is the end of fiscal year in Japan.

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2 thoughts on “Soy Sauce

  1. Neat how your impression of the scene was later influenced by your husband’s input. My daughter loves soy sauce! I like it too, but use it sparingly because of the high sodium. You can purchase lower sodium versions at the store, but they are just not the same!

    • Yes, the problem of soy sauce is much salt included. It is recommended here to add a little vinegar in what you cook, which would enhance your appetite to low-salt food. I have not tried it, though…I am so poor as a cook.

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